People who support UASC

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The People who will support and help you are:

  • Your Social Worker
  • Key Worker and Support Workers
  • Reviewing Officer
  • Designated Teacher

 

The Role of your Social Worker

This is the person who is employed by the local authority of Kent who works with you.  When you first arrive in the country, a social worker will be appointed to you, they should spend time making sure you are settled and will visit to make sure that you are happy with the way you are being cared for. You can phone your social worker and ask them to visit you (in between their regular visits) if you need to talk to them about something.

  • Their role is to provide support to enable young people to help themselves
  • They maintain professional relationships with young people, acting as guides, advocates or critical friends and working closely with the key worker
  • Undertaking and writing up assessments - (Risk, living skills, Swimming, Health, Child in Need often with medical staff), which meet specified standards and timescales
  • To help young people with their asylum claim
  • Conducting interviews with young people to assess and review their situation
  • Offering information and counselling support to young people
  • Organising and managing packages of support to enable young people to lead the fullest lives possible
  • Recommending and sometimes making decisions about the best course of action for a particular young person
  • Liaising with, and making referrals to, other agencies
  • Participating in multidisciplinary teams and meetings, for example child protection, mental health
  • Maintaining accurate records and preparing reports for age assessments and reviews
  • Giving evidence in court

 

The Role of your Key/Support Worker

If you are not living in foster care, you Key Worker is the person who has responsibility for looking after you and helping you with your day to day needs.

  • Their role is to provide support to enable young people to help themselves
  • They maintain professional relationships with young people, acting as guides, advocates or critical friends
  • Undertaking and writing up assessments, (Risk, living skills, Swimming, Health, Child in Need).
  • Conducting Key work meetings with young people to assess and review their situation; to make young people aware of the complaints procedure
  • Offering information and support to young people about living in the UK and arranging with Social workers support if Counselling was required.
  • Organising and managing packages of support to enable young people to lead the fullest lives possible; Individual Care plans, Health Plans and Reviews

 

The Role of the Independent Reviewing Officer

This is a very important person for looked after children, so it’s good for to be clear about what they do and how they are supposed to help you.

The most important thing to know is that your IRO is in charge of monitoring your case. They have to make sure the local authority is doing what it is supposed to do for you while you’re in care, make sure your placement is right for you and that you are happy. This is different from the job of your social worker, which is to manage your case.

  • Every child and young person who is looked after must have an IRO. The IRO is independent and separate from Social Services teams and management
  • Chair your review meeting
  • Check that your care plan is right for you
  • Make sure that everyone listens to what you have to say and considers it carefully when they are making decisions
  • Make sure that everyone has their say
  • Check that everyone is keeping to their part of the plan
  • Check that there are clear plans for your future
  • Check that you know how to make a complaint
  • Make sure that decisions made are implemented

 

The Role of your Designated Teacher

This is the teacher at your school or college who has particular responsibility for children who are looked after (although they may not be one of your actual teachers). He or she will know a bit about your situation, although they may not know personal things about your family background and why you are looked after.

They will talk to your social worker regularly about how you are getting on at school.  Although you may not mind people knowing that you’re in care, your designated teacher should not tell other pupils that you are, or treat you differently in front of them.

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